Tag Archives: return to work

RTW after common mental health disorders

We recently attended the Health and Wellbeing @Work conference in Birmingham where Senior Researcher from Tilburg University Dr Margot Joosen presented her findings from a study focusing on returning employees to work who were or had been absent with a mental health issue. Continue reading

Right to return within one year of absence?

The Resolution Foundation published a report titled Retention Deficit in June 2016 to discuss the challenge of increasing employment level among disabled people. This article provides a summary of the report and recommendations. All the recommendations put forward here are those of the report authors.

Despite the employment rate sitting at a record high, the government has positioned halving the disability employment gap as a central challenge for the UK labour market. Progress in employment rates among the disabled has been modest at best, but large geographic variations in disability employment rates give reason to hope that improvements are possible. Continue reading

Presenteeism vs work as means of rehabilitation

The Institute of Employment Studies (IES) published a review of presenteeism in May 2016. Occupational Health & Wellbeing reported that the headline finding of the report was that presenteeism can be beneficial. Reading the report itself, it is obvious that the writers use a different definition of ‘presenteeism’ from the one we at Honeydew would use. Continue reading

GP report vs OH report

So you have an employee who is absent with a long term ill health condition. As the manager you wonder what the future looks like for the employee. What is their prognosis? When are they likely to be able to return to work? Will they be able to do their job in full when they return? Will adjustments be needed at the workplace? Basically, you need medical advice.

As an employer, there are generally two avenues to go down in order to get a doctor’s advice when an employee is absent or suffers from ill health at work. Either you write to the employee’s GP or NHS specialist or you send them to see an Occupational Health Physician (OHP) or Nurse. Which option should you choose? It helps to understand what you can expect from the GP versus the OHP. Continue reading

Fit for Work now open

We’ve written about this before, but now it’s finally here. Employers in England and Wales are now able to refer employees to Fit for Work, the government service set up to help working people on long-term sickness absence.

Fit for Work provides occupational health services to people who have been, or are likely to be, off work for four weeks or more. It is particularly aimed at small and medium-sized businesses (SMEs) that have little or no occupational health support. Continue reading

How to: Prevent & ease musculoskeletal disorders in the work place

Focusing on getting the ergonomics right in the office, this simple 3 step plan will help you understand and prevent the causes of Musculoskeletal Disorders.

What causes Musculoskeletal Disorders (MSDs)?

Musculoskeletal disorders are caused by the effects of stress placed on your joints, muscles, nerves, tendons, ligaments, cartilage and spinal disks. Continue reading

Fit for Work?

Lord Freud said recently “Providing support where it’s needed most will help to reduce the length of time employees take off sick which in turn will cut sick pay costs, improve economic output and reduce the chance of people falling out of work and having to claim benefits”. It is for this reason that the government have decided to implement new guidelines that mean people face a ‘fit for work’ test after a 4 week absence period due to illness. Continue reading

How to: Improve the effectiveness of Return to work interviews

Return to Work (RTW) interviews have proven to be an effective absence management tool. Many companies have already incorporated the practce of conducting RTW Interviews into their absence management policies. However, many managers still struggle to undertake effective interviews – or even to find the time to carry them out at all. Continue reading